URME Question #1 Solution

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Answer!

Loan payments and interest:

  • Year 1: $4,000 principal and $1,600 interest ($16,000 X 10%)
  • Year 2: $4,000 principal and $1,200 interest ($12,000 remaining principal X 10%)
  • Year 3: $4,000 principal and $800 interest ($8,000 remaining principal X 10%)
  • Year 4: $4,000 principal and $400 interest ($4,000 remaining principal X 10%)
  • Total: $16,000 principal and $4,000 interest = $20,000

Divide $20,000 by 156 possible weekends (52 per year X ¾ = 39 for four years = 156) = $128.21

Add in $25 per weekend for maintenance and $20 per weekend for range improvements equals a total of $173.21.

So guys, turn-out for answering this question: not great (Thanks Leeland for being the only person to attempt this problem, 2 points to Gryffindor!) For some reason you guys just aren’t that excited about URME. How can I make this more fun for ya’ll? Does this comic help?

Maggie Haseman, REC Outreach Officer and Historian

URME Question #1

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Today’s the day: the first question for the free t-shirt contest (see details here)! So without further ado, here is a picture of a goat…

And now…

The Question:

Blunt Cliff Ranch, located along the Niobrara River in northern Nebraska, has planned several range improvement projects and to provide the additional cash flow to fund these improvement projects have decided to initiate a bed-and-breakfast enterprise. The 3,400-hectare ranch has a wide variety of plant communities to accommodate bird watchers, photographers, wildflower enthusiasts, and recreationalists.  Because of the seasonal time demands of the cow-calf operation, the ranch owners have determined that the bed-and-breakfast enterprise will operate a maximum of three-fourths (3/4) of the weekends in each year.  Persons will only be able to use the bed-and-breakfast for the entire weekend.  Estimated renovation costs of a dilapidated bunkhouse are $16,000; the local bank will loan this amount to the owners at 10% annual simple interest, with equal principal payment of $4,000 each of four years and interest accumulated within a year is paid that year.  The owner’s estimate that occupational costs of the bunkhouse (e.g., cleaning, electricity, maintenance, marketing) will run $25 per weekend.  In addition, another $20 per weekend will cover costs associated with planned range improvements projects.

How much will the owner’s need charge in rent for each weekend in order to completely pay off the loan principal and interest in four years, assuming that the bunkhouse will be rented every available weekend and that all profits from this enterprise will be directed to paying the loan principal and interest?

Remember:

The first person with the correct answer will receive 3 points, the second will receive 2 points and the third will receive 1 point. Every person with the correct answer after this will have the satisfaction of knowing they are enriching their minds with practice.

Answer will be posted shortly; happy studying!

Maggie Haseman, REC Outreach Officer and Historian

Native Plant of the Day

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All information from:

A Field Guide
James Stubbendieck, Stephan L. Hatch, Neal M. Bryan
Illustrated by Angie Fox, Kelly L. Rhodes, Bellamy Parks Jansen, and Debra Meier
Maps by Kathleen Lonergan-Orr and Neal M. Bryan
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Tribe: Eupatorieae
  • Species: Liatris punctata Hook.
  • Common Name: Dotted gayfeather (blazing star)
  • Life Span: Perennial
  • Origin: Native
  • Season: Warm

©J.S. Peterson. USDA NRCS NPDC. United States, CO, Denver Botanic Gardens. August 11, 2003. Usage Requirements. Any use of copyrighted images requires notification of the copyright holder.

Growth Form: forb, flowers July to October

Floral and Fruit Characteristics:

  • Inflorescences: head, sessile or short-peduncled in spike-like arrangement
  • Flowers: perfect, disk flowers, corolla purple (rarely white)
  • Fruits: achene

Vegetative Characteristics

  • Leaves: alternate, simple, linear, numerous, imbricate, glandular dots
  • Stems: erect, simple (rarely branched)
  • Other: woody caudex

Historic, Food, and Medicinal Uses

  • Woody caudex used by some Native Americans for food. Used for gonorrhea treatment in New England.

Other

  • Livestock Losses: none
  • Forage Value: fair for cattle, good for sheep, deer and pronghorn; best when plants are young; decreasing species
  • Habitat: dry plains, hills and uplands; abundant in sandy soils

Plant Mounts

Full Plant Mount

Inflorescence a purple spike, disk flowers

Leaf Blades punctate, glasbrous

Leaves alternate, linear, sessile, imbricate

Woody caudex, thick, swollen and corm-like at crown

Things to Focus on

  • White glandular dots on leaves
  • Woody caudex at base of plant
  • Purple disk flowers, pillose inside

©W.L. Wagner. Courtesy of Smithsonian Institution, Dept. of Systematic Biology, Botany. Usage Requirements. Any use of copyrighted images requires notification of the copyright holder.

*Please feel free to use the pictures of the plant mounts for studying use: print, reproduce, or use for a dart board to your heart’s content. (I took these so I give you my permission). The image of BOGR in the field is not my image, see copyright image laws to decide if you can utilize this image for your personal uses. *

Maggie Haseman, REC Outreach Officer and Historian

Question Contest: Free Range Club T-Shirt for Studying!

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We are setting up a contest. You may be able to earn a free Rangeland Ecology Club T-shirt AND you’ll study for Plant ID, and URME at the same time. Win, win!

This may not be the shirt you receive but it’ll be just as awesome (if not more)

Here are the rules:

  1. Every time a question is asked points will be awarded to the first three people with the correct answer.
  2. Points are awarded as follows: the first person with the correct answer will receive 3 points, the second will receive 2 points and the third will receive 1 point. Every person with the correct answer after this will have the satisfaction of know they are enriching their minds with practice.
  3. Questions may be posted on Facebook or the REC Blog so keep your eyes peeled and check the pages often
  4. Post your answer in the comments. Some questions may only require a single word, phrase or value to answer, however some questions will require you to show your work (and we want to see it) so scan, type or simple take a picture to upload and post.
  5. We’ll be keeping track of your points and report back to you at meetings. On January 31st we will tally the points, the top three people will be awarded a range club T-shirt. Yay!

Happy quizzing! Hope to see you at URME practice tonight (5pm in NR 201)
Maggie Haseman, REC Outreach Officer and Historian

Native Plant of the Day

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All information from:

A Field Guide
James Stubbendieck, Stephan L. Hatch, Neal M. Bryan
Illustrated by Angie Fox, Kelly L. Rhodes, Bellamy Parks Jansen, and Debra Meier
Maps by Kathleen Lonergan-Orr and Neal M. Bryan
  • Family: Malvaceae
  • Species: Sphaeralcea coccinea (Nutt.) Rydb.
  • Common Name: Scarlet globemallow (hierba del negro, red falsemallow)
  • Life Span: Perennial
  • Origin: Native
  • Season: Warm

Itty bitty baby globemallow at Waverly

Growth Form: forb (stem 10-50 cm long); flowers in April to August

Floral and Fruit Characteristics:

  • Inflorescences: terminal racemes
  • Flowers: perfect, deep orange or brick red, drying to pinkish
  • Fruits: schizocarp

Vegetative Characteristics

  • Leaves: alternate, simple with irregular palmate lobes
  • Stems: decumbent or ascending
  • Other: entire plant covered in stellate pubescence

Historic, Food, and Medicinal Uses

  • Used as a chewed paste to burns, scalds, and external sores as a cooling agent in Blackfoot culture.

Other

  • Livestock Losses: none
  • Forage Value: excellent for deer and pronghorn, worthless to domestic livestock. Important in Southwest but not in the Great Plains. Increases in abundance with heavy use and during dry periods.
  • Habitat: prairies, plains, hills. roadsides, and waste places. Adapted to many soils, prevalent in sand soils.

Plant Mounts

Things to Focus on

  • Flower color is usually a deep red or orange drying slightly lighter
  • Stellate hairs on leaves and stems

©G.A. Cooper. Courtesy of Smithsonian Institution, Department of Systematic Biology-Botany. United States, AZ, Page, 12 miles E. of on Highway 98. Usage Requirements. Any use of copyrighted images requires notification of the copyright holder.

*Please feel free to use the pictures of the plant mounts for studying use: print, reproduce, or use for a dart board to your heart’s content. (I took these so I give you my permission). The image of BOGR in the field is not my image, see copyright image laws to decide if you can utilize this image for your personal uses. *

TGIF, Right?

Maggie Haseman, REC Outreach Officer and Historian

Saturday Waverly Weeding Day

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Last Saturday Jenna Lanphier (Vice President), Michael Botelho (Bee Coordinator), Mitch Steffen (Fundraising Coordinator), Sean Maccabe (Member) and I, Maggie Haseman (Outreach Officer and Historian) piled into the range van and went to the Waverly property. We intended to give a tour to any new members interested in seeing our projects there. Unfortunately none were able to come.

Robert Emanuel (Treasurer) gave us some Round-Up to spray a few of the weeds on the learning garden path. (If you recall a past post displayed a very overgrown learning garden (or I suppose you could call it a weed learning garden). We decided to make use of some of our time out there by pulling up the monstrous plants.

Rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus nauseosus), and Russian thistle or tumbleweed (Salsola iberica) made up the majority of the unwanted vegetation. We also saw field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis).

Mike setting up the herbicide to spray the holes left behind by pulled up plants. (So they wouldn’t return in greater numbers)

Jenna, Sean and Mitch making a game plan.

These plants were MASSIVE. Sean with his conquest.

The weeds keep piling up

I thought this was cool! You could dig into the sand following the weed’s roots.

Our work here is done (It was another bummer day in Fort Collins)

We weren’t able to get everything (we’ll need a shovel for the rabbitbrush) but the change was very drastic.

We are always looking for help on our projects at Waverly. Please let us know if you want to come out to work or just to see what it’s all about! If you need incentive there could be some frozen yogurt in the picture. 🙂

Contact us via:

Native Plant of the Day

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Range plant lovers near and far, I’ve been struck with inspiration!

This blog posts native plants of the week in order to help restore the landscape through native plants. I found it as I was perusing the world wide web and then I thought, “How useful would this be in studying for the plant ID exam at the SRM Annual Meeting?” And then I answered myself, as I often do, “Soooo useful.” So I decided, from this day on I will spotlight a plant of the day from the North American Wildland Plants field guide. So today is the first day and we’ll start out with our favorite grass here in Colorado, say it with me now: blue grama or Bouteloua gracilis.

The first and most important thing to remember about blue grama is that it is the Colorado state grass.

Hierachy, Life Span and Origin

  • Family: Poacea
  • Tribe: Cynodonteae
  • Genus: Bouteloua
  • Species: gracilis
  • Life Span: Perennial
  • Origin: Native
  • Community: Short grass steppe

Distinguishing Characteristics

You will recognize the following image from your book.

Bouteloua gracilis, blue grama, grass, sketch

North American Wildland Plants: A Field Guide
James Stubbendieck, Stephan L. Hatch, & L. M. Landholt
Illustration: Bellamy Jansen
Map: Kathleen Lonergran-Orr
Pg. 86

Look for the following to identify:

  • Panicle of spicate unilateral branches.
  • Curved branches, not extending beyond spikelets
  • papilla-based hairs on the midvein

Plant Mount

Bouteloua gracilis, plant mount, blue grama

Full plant, mounted

Bouteloua gracilis, blue grama, plant mount, inflorescence

Inflorescence on a plant mount

Bouteloua gracilis, plant mount, blue grama, basal leaves

basal leaves on a plant mount

***Please feel free to use the pictures of the plant mounts for studying use: print, reproduce, or use for a dart board to your heart’s content. (I took these so I give you my permission). The image of BOGR in the field is not my image, see copyright image laws to decide if you can utilize this image for your personal uses. ***

Until we meet again, your humble plant delivery service, Maggie Haseman (REC Outreach Officer)

Is this helpful? Is there anything you would like to see to help you study?

A Few Things You Might Want to Know

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Hello lovely Range Club people,

The first meeting of the year was a huge success. A huge thanks to everyone for coming! It was catered by Souza’s Barbeque: chicken and pulled pork sandwiches, four sauce choices, cornbread muffins, macaroni and chesse, mashed potatoes. There was also macaroni salad, garlic rolls, and German plum kuchen. Yummy! Basically, we want you to know that it’s only the best for our members. Enough about food though we also had a quick overview of what the CSU Rangeland Ecology Club does and who we are.

Souzas Barbeque, potluck, club meeting

We are the student chapter of the Colorado Section of the Society for Range Management. It is expected that you will become a member of this society if you are a member of this club, (especially if you wish to attend the annual meeting; more on that later). With all this in mind we do not collect dues.

So, you might be wondering, “What is the Society for Range Management?” This is THE professional society to join if you are interested in a profession in range. It is a non-profit, international organization, of well-trained and highly motivated group of professionals and rangeland users working with productive, sustainable rangeland ecosystems (That’s their vision statement). Every year SRM holds a meeting (called the Annual Meeting… big surprise). This year’s meeting is in Oklahoma City, OK.

Annual Meeting 2011
Back: Faculty Advisor: Paul Meiman, CSU Extension Specialists: Casey Matney, Robert Emanuel, Miranda McCutchin, Mike Braumbaugh, Maggie Haseman
Front: Baili Foster, Kristin Oles, Shannon Thompson

Annual Meeting 2012
Back: Simon Thomas, Sean Maccabe, Shannon Thompson, Bailey Wise, Kristin Oles, Robert Emanuel, Sarah Newton, Amy Yedo, Maggie Haseman, Katie Dykgreve, URME Coach: Roy Roath, Faculty Advisor: Paul Meiman
Front: Jenna Lanphier, Baili Foster, Erin Kowalski, Mitch Steffen, Plant ID Coach: Brett Wolk

Why should I go to the annual meeting, you ask? Because it’s awesome! But besides that reason (as if you need more motivation), like I said before SRM is a professional society, therefore their meeting is full of professionals. And guess what their favorite thing to do is… talk to students! The Annual Meeting is a wonderful opportunity to network with people you may work with in the future.

Need more reasons to attend? At the annual meeting, students can participate in a variety of competitions: Plant Identification, Undergraduate Rangeland Management Exam, Public Speaking and Rangeland Cup.

Back: Coach Brett Wolk, Shannon Thompson, Katie Dykgreve, Sean Maccabe, Amy Yedo, Sarah Newton, Mitch Steffen. Front: Baili Foster, Simon Thomas, Erin Kowalski

The Plant Identification contest is one of the most difficult tests you will probably see. However, that shouldn’t discourage you; it is also very rewarding. Studying for this exam is very beneficial for your rangeland knowledge (and your social life), also it’s a great resume booster. Our coach is Brett Wolk. If you would like to join the Plant ID team let us know through email: RangeClubCSU@gmail.com or find an officer in person.

The Undergraduate Rangeland Management Exam (more affectionately known as the URME) is a written examination, which tests your basic knowledge of rangeland ecosystems and management. Our coach is Roy Roth. If you would like to join the URME team let us know through email: RangeClubCSU@gmail.com or find an officer in person.

Baili Foster, participant in extemporaneous speaking competition

The Public Speaking (aka extemporaneous speaking) competition tests students on their ability to use resources, develop a speech, and present it in one day. Each student draws three topics and chooses one; topics can be anything from NEPA to wild horses to rotational grazing. There is not currently a formal club to practice this skill. If enough interest is generated we will consider starting one.

Robert Emanuel, Kristen Oles, Bailey Wise and Baili Foster

The final competition available to undergraduate students is Rangeland Cup. Each school is allowed two teams of four students. The topic for study will be released later this month and the teams research this topic in order to design a management plan that solves the problem presented. The teams create a poster and present the poster for judging at the Annual Meeting. Teams decide meeting times and dates.

A Few Other Topics:

Henderson Mill 2010
Robert Emanuel, Kristin Oles, Maggie Haseman, Baili Foster, Mike Braumbaugh, Mirando McCutchin and Shannon Thompson

Henderson 2011
Back: Simon THomas, Mitch Steffen, Robert Emanuel, Jenna Lanphier, John Webster
Front: Shannon Thompson, Sarah Newton, Bailey Wise, Baili Foster
(my apologies to those pictured that I could not identify. If you are in this picture let me know)

The Henderson Mill restoration project is one of the fundraising projects REC has participated in for a few years. In the past we have pulled cattails in the riparian area surrounding the mill and transplanted willow plugs. Who knows what will be in store for us this year but planning is in the works. Bob, REC treasurer, is working hard with the coordinator at the facility to get this trip organized. We are hoping for the last weekend in September or the first weekend in October (any later and it gets very cold for outdoor work). Fill out this doodle poll for the dates that work best for you.

Robert Emanuel, Miranda McCutchin, Kristin Oles, Shannon Thompson, Past Plant ID Coah: Mae Smith, Faculty Advisor: Paul Meiman
(If you are in the picture and were not labeled please let me know)

Prepping for the Plant ID Learning Garden

Sarah, REC president, is trying to coordinate a trip to Waverly for Tuesday September, 11 and the weekend following. We need to check on the bees and assess some of our other projects there. Check Facebook and Twitter for updates.

Fall Picnic

Every year we like to host a barbeque picnic at City Park in order to create an informal place for students to interface with professionals in Colorado. This year we hope to have it in mid-September, but dates are not nailed down yet. More details will be made available as plans are developed.

he Colorado Section Board of Directors Meeting in La Junta, CO is September 12-13. A couple members are headed down to present a report about the Waverly Tour last semester, a bee update, and our plans for this coming year. There will also be an optional tour of Jackson Ranch. If you would like to come to the meeting, fill out this doodle poll (please don’t fill it out unless you want to attend). Sleeping arrangements and transportation are free! If you can only go for Wednesday (not overnight) note this on the doodle poll. P.S. this is a university excused absence.

As always keep up with day to day happening in range club and the most recent news in rangelands on our Facebook and Twitter pages.

Until next time; over-and-out… Maggie Haseman, REC Outreach Officer

Questions? Leave a comment or shoot us an email: RangeClubCSU@gmail.com.